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DeVotchKa Presents Man With A Movie Camera

DeVotchKa Presents Man With A Movie Camera

SCREENING INFO & TICKETS
Saturday, Feb 1, 8:00 PM, Kimball Theatre
Tickets – $25

SPONSORED BY THE VIRGINIA FILM OFFICE WITH ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM W&M RUSSIAN & POST-SOVIET STUDIES

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
The internationally renowned band DeVotchKa will perform an original score to the classic 1929 silent film Man with A Movie Camera.

ABOUT DEVOTCHKA
A cross-pollination of numerous influences, including cabaret, spaghetti Westerns, norteño, punk, and the immigrant dance music of Eastern Europe, Colorado-based quartet DeVotchKa, features Nick Urata (vocals, guitar, trumpet), Tom Hagerman (violin, accordion), Jeanie Schroder (sousaphone, bass) and percussionist Shawn King.

They found widespread success in 2006 with their Grammy-nominated soundtrack to the hit indie film Little Miss Sunshine. Signing with revered indie, Anti-, the band delivered A Mad and Faithful Telling in early 2008, reaching the number nine slot on the Billboard Heatseekers chart. After doing more soundtrack work, this time for the 2009 comedy I Love You Phillip Morris, the group returned to the studio to create another album, 100 Lovers, released in 2011. Over the next several years, Urata became increasingly involved in his own film composition career, scoring movies like Crazy Stupid Love, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Paddington, and the Netflix series A Series of Unfortunate Events. The band regrouped to create their sixth album, This Night Falls Forever, released in 2018.

ABOUT THE FILM
Part documentary and part cinematic art, this film follows a city in the 1920s Soviet Union throughout the day, from morning to night without titles or narration. Director Dziga Vertov celebrates the modernity of the city, with its vast buildings, dense population and bustling industries through a variety of complex and innovative camera shots.

Met by polarizing reviews at the time of its release, the film is now regarded by many as one of the greatest films ever made, and was awarded the honor of Best Documentary of All Time in a recent Sight & Sound critics poll. In 2009, Roger Ebert wrote: “It made explicit and poetic the astonishing gift the cinema made possible, of arranging what we see, ordering it, imposing a rhythm and language on it, and transcending it.”

HOSTED BY
Alexander Prokhorov
Russian & Post-Soviet Studies Program Director

Info
Director

Dziga Vertov

Country

Soviet Union

Year

1929

Rating

Not Rated

Languages

Silent Film

Runtime

68 Minutes